Helgoland by Carlo Rovelli

Heligoland. Carlo Rovelli's book on Werner Heisenberg

The challenge of science is not only to discover or propose solutions for everything. The issue is also about offering knowledge to the world. Divulging is as necessary as it is complicated when the arguments are introduced in the depths of each discipline. But as the wise man said, we are human and nothing of…

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The death told by a sapiens to a Neanderthal

Not everything was going to be that blind toast to life. Because in the maxim that governs everything, that premise that indicates the existence of things only based on their opposite value, life and death make up the essential framework between whose extremes we move. And reason...

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The Runaway Kind by Anthony Brandt

We delve into the great secret of human evolution, the prodigy that was the differential fact. We don't talk so much about intelligence but about creativity. With intelligence, a proto-man could understand what fire was from the consequences of approaching it. Thanks to creativity...

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From Inside, by Martin Amis

Literature as a way of life sometimes explodes with a work that stands on the threshold of the narrative, the chronic and the biographical. And that ends up being the most sincere exercise of the writer who mixes inspirations, evocations, memories, experiences ... Just what Martín Amis offers us in ...

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Under the gaze of the awake dragon, by Mavi Doñate

Being a reporter validates all the points in considering yourself someone traveled. Because to narrate what happens anywhere in the world you have to have that fundamental knowledge to convey what is happening with credibility. The result may well be, as in this case, a ...

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Sacramento, by Antonio Soler

That the poles attract is a dictation of physics. From there the mother of all our contradictions. The extreme positions in the human end up joining with that unstoppable sensation of magnetism or inertia. Good and evil expose their catalogs of principles and temptations and everything ...

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Inventory of Some Lost Things, Judith Schalansky

There are no more paradises than the lost, as John Milton would say. Nor things more valuable than those that you no longer have, nor can you observe. The true wonders of the world then are more those that we end up losing or destroying than those that today would be invented as such, adding ...

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The Art of War Between Companies, by David Brown

Sun Tzu wrote his book "The Art of War" back in the XNUMXth century BC. Many battles later, and from the XNUMXth century until today, the new conflicts where to apply good or bad arts are disputed between multinationals or state corporations. We then move on to the art of ...

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The Great Lantern, by Maria Konnikova

Writer before she was a poker player, María Konnikova came to the game of card games from the impulse of every narrator who wants to approach a new narrative scenario to soak up the context. We add to the matter his doctorate in psychology and we find a sophisticated version of the Pelayo ...

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